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Debate Info

9
49
Maybe. Wait..., what? No!!!
Debate Score:58
Arguments:70
Total Votes:58
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 Maybe. (9)
 
 Wait..., what? No!!! (47)

Debate Creator

jolie(9805) pic



Is Germany forgetting its Post World Wars History Lesson on Debt Relief in Greece Crisis?

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/08/business/economy/germanys-debt-history-echoed-in-greece.html?mabReward=A3&moduleDetail=recommendations-1&action=click&contentCollection=Science&region=Footer&module=WhatsNext&version=WhatsNext&contentID=WhatsNext&configSection=article&isLoggedIn=false&src=recg&pgtype=article

 

The Germans benefited from the deal in 1953, which underpinned Germany’s postwar economic miracle. Twenty years earlier, Germany defaulted on its debts from World War I, after undergoing a bout of hyperinflation and economic depression that helped usher Hitler to power.

Maybe.

Side Score: 9
VS.

Wait..., what? No!!!

Side Score: 49
1 point

So...,

if we give the Greeks a good deal (debt relief), they may achieve an economic miracle.

if not, they may default on their debt anyway and start WWIII.

Side: Maybe.
2 points

Let's be honest without ourselves: Germany, even in such a miserable state, had serious military and economic potential that allowed a leader such as Hitler to help lead to the development of something such as the Third Reich. Greece produces incredibly little, and economically is not very powerful.

Now their military spending is more than the NATO average, but not substantial enough that they could pull off the type of sudden annexation necessary to form a Third Reich type event. On top of that, any such action would invoke the ire of Turkey, a country that is certainly in a position to stomp any sort of possible expansionist surge.

Simply speaking, I don't think Greece is important enough to be able to start WWIII. That said, there is indeed the possibility of Greece pulling off an economic miracle if they were given solid debt relief, but I think it would require them to pretty solidly rework their current economic structure, which I don't think they are ready to do.

Side: Wait..., what? No!!!
1 point

They can still default and say, "Yeah, well, we talked it over and decided we ain't paying."

Side: Wait..., what? No!!!

Well with those 15 top billionaires listed by Obama (like the France's richest woman,the owner of Ferrero Rocher)you expect them to clear Greece off their immediate burden.

Side: Maybe.
Cartman(18192) Disputed
1 point

You don't become a billionaire by letting a country spend all of your money.

Side: Wait..., what? No!!!
Atrag(5556) Clarified
2 points

Shit. , that's where I am going wrong :/

Side: Maybe.
daver(1771) Clarified
1 point

According to Obama, if your a billionaire, you didn't do it by your self anyway, so hand over the cash.

-

Edit: Obama is the Borg collective. Resistance is futile (or so he would have us think).

Side: Maybe.
Amritangshu(892) Disputed
1 point

Well there's nothing wrong in showing some charity,they're only to clear Greek off their debts.

Side: Maybe.
2 points

Debt relief only came after a World War.

Let us not forget that the source of Germany's debt was from the Treaty of Versailles imposed on them after World War I. They were forced to accept the blame for a war they did not cause and pay reparations.

Greece made its own debt. Germany's debt was forced onto them. One is more deserving than the other.

Side: Wait..., what? No!!!
1 point

So... should we wait for a world depression followed by a World War?

Side: Wait..., what? No!!!
flewk(1192) Clarified
1 point

We should probably wait for Greece to go bankrupt on its own. There is no reason to provide debt relief to a country that refuses to enact domestic debt relief.

Side: Maybe.
1 point

Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia etc etc are poorer than Greece yet they recovered without debt relief so it is no wonder why their people are wondering why Greece is so special and cannot get itself out of trouble.

Side: Wait..., what? No!!!
1 point

What I don't understand is why Greece didn't send a little horse, as a gift, with their letter asking for more loans.

Side: Wait..., what? No!!!
1 point

Greece is far too lazy to start a world war. That's part of the reason why they haven't received debt relief. It requires hard work.

Side: Wait..., what? No!!!
1 point

What are you saying? I am planing on becoming a Greek citizen so I can retire!!!

Side: Wait..., what? No!!!
1 point

No need. I have some land in Florida I can sell you. You can retire there. ;)

Side: Wait..., what? No!!!
1 point

Firstly, anyone can refer back to an isolated, specific point in history which suits their argument. The main recipients of the American aid programme, or the 'Marshall Plan' ( which was a loan, now repaid,) were France, the United Kingdom and Germany. no prizes for knowing the nation which used Uncle Sam's dosh to the best advantage. The Germans defaulted on the payments of the debt incurred as a result of the death and destruction they caused during WW1, whereas Greece dishonored the pledges they gave to secure the massive loans which they needed to keep their ''donkey and cart' economy in the 21st century. So, you're not really comparing like with like. The Greeks, along with the Argentinians stand as the pariahs on the international stage.

Side: Wait..., what? No!!!
1 point

But shouldn't we give them a break? I mean, I saw that movie, "My Big Fat Wedding" and it was pretty funny. I think we should cut the some slack.

Side: Wait..., what? No!!!
Kalamazoo(333) Clarified
1 point

Out of date proverb ;-''Beware Greeks bearing gifts''. No quarter should be given. The money which was given, and will continue to be given, derives from the hard working taxpayers of the Euro Zone States. The politicians, ( who in my opinion, were guilty of gross misconduct), were charged with the responsibility of using taxpayer's dosh wisely and prudently, but instead acted with blind disregard of Greece's disastrous economy and betrayed the electorate of their respective countries and should be summarily dismissed and charged with criminal negligence. Successive Greek governments willfully flaunted the fiscal restrictions governing membership of the Euro Zone in the full knowledge of the inevitable consequences. What, I ask, has changed within the Greek economy to make anyone think that they will be able to repay any new loans never mind the existing amount of £ 340 billion? Other countries which could shortly follow Greece include, Portugal, Spain and Italy. Should all these siesta loving, wine drinking nations all be ''cut some slack''?

Side: Maybe.